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Lufft WS10: An affordable solid state weather station with TCP/IP over WiFi

There are now thousands of internet connected personal weather stations around the world. There is a wide range of different models. Some contain just weather and humidity sensors, while some add wind and UV gauges as well. Most prosumer and consumer stations operate on batteries, which can make them tedious to service.

One option to battery operated stations is the Lufft WS10 weather station. The device operates on 24 volt direct current (DC), and connects to the local network or the internet using WiFi. Unlike most affordable weather stations like Davis' Vantage series, the WS10 has no moving parts. Precipitation is measured using a Doppler radar and wind speed and direction using a thermal element.

Because of wired power entry and solid state construction, the WS10 is maintentance free and does not require maintenance. This makes it an ideal device for building automation or as a sensor for advanced home automation needs. The unit measures temperature, humidity, air pressure, wind speed and direction, in addition to intensity and type of precipitation. Additional data collected by the sensor includes UV index, direction of the sun and environment radiation levels.

In addition to the wireless WLAN network (using a TCP/IP socket), the Lufft WS10 can also be connected using a serial connection (RS-485). The communications protocol over WiFi is limited to UMB Binary, but the serial connection also supports UMB ASCII 2.0 and Modbus. The easiest way to set up the device is to configure it to send data to the Wunderground weather service using the provided Configtool.NET application available for Windows and Android.

For more detailed access users can connect the WS10 to the Meteohub application that support many Lufft weather station models. The Meteohub software (also available as a complete appliance) acts as a data logger. It also creates history graphs from the data, and can also send data to online weather services such as the Met Office WOW (Weather Observations Website). Professionals and enthusiasts can also connect to the UMB or Modbus interfaces directly.

The Lufft WS10 was launched in August 2018 and retails for around $750 for the sensor alone. More information available from the Lufft website: Lufft WS10 Smart Weather Sensor